Google Earth Releases Satellite Pics That Show The Impact Humans Have Made To The World

Google Earth Releases Satellite Pics That Show The Impact Humans Have Made To The World

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Humans have long replaced nature as the dominant force shaping Planet Earth. Over the years, we’ve cleared out forests, filled up mighty rivers for vast roads, and have even migrated thousands of species across the world. Over 7 billion people are presently on Earth, and by the year 2100, its project could be around an 11.2billion. Humans’ impact on Earth is now profound and irreversible, leaving many environmentalists to question the future of the place where life is known to exist.

So what does this look like? In recent decades, Google Earth has been tracking the significant transformations we’ve formed through Satellite. In a series of clips recently posted on YouTube, Google Earth showed how much our world’s oceans, beaches, glaciers ad cities have changed from 1984 to 2020 while promoting climate change awareness through its new time-lapse future. The differences are somewhat depressing, and here we’ve collated 16 of the most revealing changes. Have a look!

#1 Newfoundland And Labrador In Canada 1984 Vs. 2020

Google Earth

#2 Atsimo – Andrefana In Madagascar 1984 Vs. 2020

Google Earth

#3 Enright In Oregon In The United States 1984 Vs. 2020 

Google Earth

Google Earth’s time-lapse project is carried out with the assistance of government agencies, including the European Space Agency, the US Geological Survey, NASA, and even the European Union. Reportedly, the time-lapse features an estimated 24 million satellite photos compiled by Google Earth from the mentioned above agencies to show the actual impact of how nature has changed. 

#4 Sara In Bolivia 1984 Vs. 2020

Google Earth

#5 The Mamore River In Bolivia 1984 Vs. 2020 

Google Earth

#6 The Chatham In Massachusetts 1984 Vs. 2020

Google Earth

Specifically, the time-lapse tech is created with the help of Carnegie Mellon University. A total of two million processing hours was required to process the 20 petabytes of imagery to establish the 4.4 terapixel zoomable video mosaic of Planet Earth. Speaking with The Associated Press, Climate Scientist Mahawald claims the time-lapse project is amazing and will help people understand climate change and its impact on our environment. 

#7 Mato Grosso In Brazil 1984 Vs. 2020

Google Earth

#8 The Nuflo De Chavez In Bolivia 1984 Vs. 2020

Google Earth

#9 Singapore 1984 Vs. 2020

Google Earth

As a result of this overwhelming evidence, climate change is undeniably accurate, and indeed, there are plenty of skeptics. It’s saddening that climate change has gotten politicized, but then there have been some positive advances in the fight against climate change. In particular, deforestation does have all sorts of disturbing side effects, from increased global warming via the reduction in carbon dioxide, absorbing trees to shrinking habitats for forest species, the pressure on cropland is really on the rise. 

#10 The Columbia Glacier In Alaska USA 1984 Vs. 2020

Google Earth

#11 The Aral Sea In Kazakhstan 1984 Vs. 2020

Google Earth

#12 Shanghai In China 1984 Vs. 2020

Google Earth

While Google Earth pointed out that almost half of the world’s forests have already been degraded for human use, the rate of deforestation has reportedly lessened. From 2015 to 2020, the deforestation rate benched at 10milion hectares yearly, down from 16million hectares yearly in the 1990s. However, this drop doesn’t change the fact that trees are still being cut down, and whether this trend will continue largely depends on humans. 

#13 The Mylius-Erichsen Land In Greenland 1984 Vs. 2020

Google Earth

#14 The Pearl River Delta In China 1984 Vs. 2020

Google Earth

#15 Las Vegas In The USA 1984 Vs. 2020

Google Earth

#16 Dubai, UAE 1984 Vs. 2020

Google Earth

One of the big environmental challenges is global warming, which proves much more complex to stop than the hole in the ozone layer. It will mainly entail seeking out clean sources, including the revolution in renewable solutions such as wind and solar, which can help switch fossil fuels like coal, oil, and natural gas.