Someone Asks Why Do Women Have Periods, And This Professor Perfectly Answers

Someone Asks Why Do Women Have Periods, And This Professor Perfectly Answers

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Why do women have periods? Why are we born with a bodily function that demands us to bleed every month? It’s not just bloody, but also painful for some and even horrible for many. However, it is part of our reproductive system, and we can only grit our teeth when it gets painful every month.

Finally, someone asks the question: why do we have periods? From an evolutionist stance, what is this period supposed to mean, and what are the explanations?

Suzanne Sadedin

A professor who teaches in Monash and Havard shares how evolution explains the existence of period.

Suzanne Sadedin

People have long believed that period is necessary when it comes to healthy body function. However, truthfully, a professor of sexual and reproductive health spoke to Guardian, “It is not helpful to have these periods—in fact, if you don’t have them, one of the biggest benefits would be reducing iron deficiency anemia.”

A regular period is a way to discern a woman’s reproductive system health and fertility. The human body is complex and cannot be segregated into ‘what’s unnecessary’ and ‘what’s necessary.’ There are still many to be explored and understood, much like how we once believed our pinky toes weren’t necessary, yet, it had proven to be a vital part of our body for balancing!

Having to bleed – profusely for some – as part of a normal body function sounds like a giant flaw. Perhaps, there will be more we can understand in the future as more studies are done. Also, by openly discussing this topic, we hope to remove the stigma around period and help more people, especially men, understand what it is.