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Wrestler Jordynne Grace Spreads Body Positivity With New Photography Project

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Wrestler Jordynne Grace Spreads Body Positivity With New Photography Project

“People you never think would have body issues have body issues.”

Jordynne Grace who’d just won the Knockouts tag-team titles with Rachael Ellering shares that she will be using her title and privilege to start a project that dispels body image issues, Sports Illustrated reported.

“People you never think would have body issues have body issues,” the former one-time Impact Knockouts Champion shared.

The project aims to improve people’s image of what pro-wrestlers look like.

Instead of conforming to the typical unrealistic beauty standard, Jordynne, whose real name is Patricia Forrest Parker, took part in the project that was held during WrestleMania week in Florida.

The names who have joined aside from Grace are Faye Jackson, Lady Frost, Katalina Perez, Nevaeh Chantelle, Holidead, Mazzerati, Davienne, Alejandra Lion, Becca and Dillon McQueen.

It was in hopes to change what has been let to fester for so long that Grace accepted Dildon in what was initially an all-women session.

“I’ve seen Dillon do a 180 with his body,” she shared. “He’s suffered from body image issues his whole life, so when he asked me to be part of it, he was welcomed.”

“There are so many different shapes and sizes for men in wrestling. There are guys shaped like beer kegs.”

“People still think there is a certain way for a woman to look in professional wrestling.”

“It really bothers me when so many people comment on women’s bodies.”

She shares that she was especially fired up when she sees a flood of negative comments people make when women don’t look a certain way. And these comments are often more vicious and tenacious against women compared to men.

She was inspired by the group picture of Olympic athletes Howard Schatz from a book titled ‘Athletes.’

Howard’s 2002 pictures lined up female athletes of various background and culture, showing various body types in their peak performance. Grace wishes to crush WWE’s toxic narrative that you have to be “real thin and look like a model” through these pictures.

“There is a great variation in athlete bodies and criticizing anyone’s appearance without knowing their background does them a disservice,” she spoke of the message she wishes to get out of this.

“Athletes suffer disproportionately from body dysmorphia and depression stemming from that,” she continued. “So I believe the body positivity movement combats the constant thought that we’ll never fit society’s standard of what an ‘athlete’ should look like.”

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